genomics

 

For many years I wandered through my career, jumping on various opportunities as they came along, but without a real “direction” for where I was going.

I was fortunate in that I made some good choices – getting into bioinformatics early on, and then getting into proteomics early on – before the fields became popular. But, despite the outward success this has brought to me, I’ve ...(read more)

{ 2 comments }

 

Morgan was invited to participate in a meeting designed to give feedback to the NIH for the future of informatics for handling the flood of data from the “post genome” era of biology. It is a huge challenge. But in the meeting, the primary focus was all about the machines – hardware and software that it will take to get it done. I ...(read more)

{ 0 comments }

 

The genome era is an incredible time to be in science, but also presents unprecedented challenges.   With the publishing of the first complete human genome just about 10 years ago, major questions remain, such as:

Where are all the genes located on the genome? How and when are the genes regulated? How are those genes spliced to form different variants of genes? Which of the genes encode proteins, and which encode other functional RNAs?

It turns out that “sequencing a genome” was only a ...(read more)

{ 0 comments }

 

I just saw a neat talk by Eric Schadt, PhD who is the Chief Scientific Officer of Pacific Biosciences.  First he showed off the new sequencing technology they are developing, which promises to absolutely blow away the current “next-generation” sequencing technologies.  They use a micro (or maybe nano?) fabricated waveguide to isolate a single polymerase molecule, then they use fluorescently labeled nucleotides with a cleavable linker.  When each nucleotide comes into the polymerase for incorporation into the growing DNA string, ...(read more)

{ 2 comments }

retargeter