grantwriting

 

This is a guest post by Robert Finney, PhD.

The new NIH Biographical Sketch format is required for research grants submitted on or after May 25, 2015.  Foremost, the new format represents great potential to enhance investigator credibility – but only for those that understand how to use it to their advantage. In contrast, it can be lethal for those that do not.

The biggest opportunity and highest impact will be on young investigators and established investigators with less-than-stellar publication ...(read more)

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In this work, I see all kinds of crazy things. I label them as crazy not because I want to make judgement. I call them crazy because they lead to consequences that are at odds with the pronounced goals that people have for themselves.

So, let’s say, for example, that someone pronounces: “I want to learn how to get more grants funded.”

Then let’s say that they take it to the next logical step: “I’m going to pursue some training on this!”

Yay! ...(read more)

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A few days ago, I got this email:

 

The very same day, I got an email from someone else, which I’ve excerpted parts of here

“I been a virtual attendee for a number of your past webinars, and have appreciated the insights you’ve shared. I have been looking for success in a new research area, and it has been elusive because it is novel, innovative and pushes the envelope…

“So, I did the best I could to incorporate your themes and messages and recently ...(read more)

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Grants suck. That’s funny, coming from someone who has been helping people with them for the past four years. However, working with so many people on them, I’ve seen the dark sides. There are several.

The grant game breeds fear. Lots of it. Fear breeds conservatism and unhealthy competitiveness. Fear is the enemy of creative thinking, and it is the enemy of fun, freedom, and clarity.

The conservatism that comes from fear leads most reviewers to be extremely conservative about what they’ll ...(read more)

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One of the great things about working with some top scientists to hone their grant-getting skills is that I get to hear really good questions that they struggle with.

One question from a client was this:

“I am a bit confused about what goes in the Significance and the Innovation sections of my proposal, and how those are different from the Approach.”

In my grant writing classes like the Grant Dynamo, I teach the concept posing “problem-solution” pairs. These pairs always come together, ...(read more)

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